Description

This internationally known fast food chain serves up the most delicious burgers and unique desserts for breakfast, lunch and dinner. This Mc Donald's located in Cairo, is completely Halal and alcohol-free. 

...more

Cairo, Egypt

Profile-image
Loader

Description

This internationally known fast food chain serves up the most delicious burgers and unique desserts for breakfast, lunch and dinner. This Mc Donald's located in Cairo, is completely Halal and alcohol-free. 

CrescentRating

CrescentRating: Not CrescentRated

Address

Ad Dawawin,  Abdin, Cairo Governorate, Egypt

Website

http://www.mcdonaldsegypt.com

Phone

+20 2 27958129

  • No Attraction found.
  • No Halal dish found.
  • You Can't Miss Out on These When You're In Cairo

    Egyptian food is completely delicious, mouth-watering and unforgivingly lush, but sadly it is also underrated. It's hard to find Egyptian restaurants abroad when you have other Middle-eastern food competitors like Lebanon, Morocco, and even Syria. However, this gives Egyptian food an advantage, with no expectations, these dishes will blow your mind with the unusual and delicious combinations, fresh flavors and satisfying ingredients. via GIPHY Starters or Fast Food 1. Foul Image Credit: One Arab Vegan; The Foul is a dish made for all, regardless of their social status, thanks to how nutritious it is.  Foul or also known as Fava Beans – The Egyptians are known for their love for Foul in the Middle East. Foul Medames are blended into a paste, with cumin, oil, and salt. You can eat it as a side dish with bread as a starter or you can also find them in sandwiches. You can't get bored with this classic. There are also other variations like the Foul Iskandarani with salad toppings, Foul Medames, Garlic Foul, Chili Foul, and the list goes on. 2. Koshari Image Credit: The Mediterranean Dish; The Koshari may not be the healthiest meal out there, but it really is a meal unique to the Egyptian culture. If you want to eat fast food with no fuss but plenty of flavors, Koshari is the delight of Egypt that can never disappoint. With a base of buttery macaroni (a type of pasta) soft rice, flavored lentils, a tangy salsa sauce, hearty chickpeas and caramelized onions (Now, this is the best bit). You have a hearty dish that will keep you full and satisfied (And did I mention how sleepy you'll get after this heavy meal? You have no idea). 3. Tamia Falafel and Tahini Image Credit: Pille-Riin Priske; The Falafel tastes amazing when it's still warm and crisp. Don't forget to dip it in the Tahini for an extra tangy taste.  Honestly, this is the poor man and a rich man's food. In the West, a sandwich of this type costs up to $10, in Egypt it won't cost you more than 50 cents.This sandwich is best bought in 2,3,4 or more, One is not enough. You get a choice of a mini thin baguette or little pouch of pitta bread, filled with Tahini, mixed salad (fresh tomato, onions, cucumber, salad, and herbs), sometimes Hummus and finally the warm falafels that are squashed to make sure every mouthful explodes with flavor. via GIPHY Note: The Egyptian falafel uses the famous Foul Medames, Fava Beans, Chickpeas, a mixture of spices (varIant to each individual) and with no doubt parsley, coriander, and green herbs to give its signature color. Also Read: A Muslim's Guide to Shopping in Cairo: 10 Must-Visit Places! Main Dishes 1. Mahshi Image Credit: Vedat Zorluer; Though you'll find this dish relatively common in the region, the Mahshi is still a must-try in Cairo where different cities will have different renditions of the Mahshi or the Dolma. This dish has different names as is also known as Dolma in Turkey. Consisting of many variants including Courgette, vine leaves, peppers, cabbage leaves. They are often stuffed with spiced rice but you can also find minced meat ones and even rarely minced chicken. You can never be bored and each home or restaurant adds their twists to the dish, so it's difficult to not like this dish. A classic and it would be a shame to miss out! 2. Pigeon and Molokhia This one is not for the light-hearted. If you are a meat lover and want to try one of Egypt's signature meat dishes, then pigeon is the way to go. Egyptians love this dish paired with a good 3ish (bread also meaning life) and Molokhia stew made with the plant of Corchorus. The texture of this stew is quite slimy but it takes some getting used to. Dating from Ancient Egypt, you can be transported back to Egyptian Pharaohs by eating this dish. 3. Macaroni Bechamel Image Credit: Nawal Escape; This dish can be too dairy-heavy so pair this dish with the Egyptian Chamomile Tea or any type of tea to ease the tummy.  Egyptians claim to be the inventor of this dish, but pasta is Italian and Bechamel is French. However, the compilation of this dish is very Egyptian. Pasta is layered on top of each other into a block and covered with creamy Bechamel, minced meat, a bit of tomato sauce and even more Bechamel. It's comfort food for most and can be found in every restaurant. 4. Sujuk and Kibbeh Image Credit: Renata C. F. Correa RenataCorreaMG; The Kibbeh can be a little daunting, but you know what? Just go for it! A meat feast for meat lovers. Sujuk is the classic spicy sausage which you can find alone, with your classic sides of rice or chips, on pizzas, in sandwiches, on Fateera and the list goes on. As for Kibbeh, a definite either love it or hate it situation, is liver fried with garlic and onions. The flavor isn't overpowering but the texture is not for the light-hearted. 5. Fateera My personal favorite, it's an Egyptian pizza with a buttery fine pastry base. Its endless layers of pastry goodness can be eaten sweet or salty. Either filled with delightful cream (Ashta), nuts or chocolate, drenched in syrup. This tempting pie can hardly be shared. For those who prefer savory or want a meal you can have any of your favorite pizza toppings, meat, chicken, veg and cheeses, instead, they are hidden between the layers. Also Read: 10 Museums Around The World That You Must Visit Dessert 1.Kunefe The joy you feel when you pull the Kunefe away and see the strings of cheese is extra rewarding. Though the syrup may be too sweet, the cream surrounding the dessert creates a good balance. For those with a sweet tooth, Kunefe although Palestinian in origin, can be found all over Egypt. Kunefe is vermicelli drenched in a caramel syrup sauce with a surprise center of stringy cheese that absorbs the outside flavor. The original Kunefe is topped with crushed pistachios and more of the delicious sticky syrup. Modern variants include peach and icecream, Nutella, white chocolate and many more. When you're in the middle east, it's essential to try the original then experiment with the new twists. 2. Umm Ali Image Credit: Dinner With Julie; The Umm Ali is a dessert meant to be shared with a group of friends or families which resonates well with the middle eastern culture.  Umm Ali translates as Ali's mother, but don't worry this is a completely vegetarian dessert. No mothers were harmed in the making of this dessert. The story goes that the Wife of an Ayyubid leader (a royal caliphate from Egypt) would make this dish, especially for her husband. There are many variations of this dessert but it can be difficult to find the right one due to its supreme delicacy. It is a layered pudding dessert with fine pastry layers, a sort of milk pudding, raisins, pistachios, any kind of nuts, cinnamon and finally roasted till a golden. via GIPHY There you have it, 10 Egyptian dishes to try and the variants and other dishes will introduce to a whole new world of food, even Aladdin couldn’t have on his magic carpet ride....

  • Who Is Mo Salah? Story of an emerging star from the land of Pyramids

    Born in the Egyptian city of Basyoun, 100km or so north of Cairo, Mohamed Salah Ghaly’s footballing journey began in the Nasr City district of the country’s capital. Often nicknamed as 'The Pharoah', he is an Egyptian professional footballer who plays as forward for an English club in Liverpool and the Egyptian national team. Picture Credit: Background Images HD A talented youngster, he honed his skills in the youth teams of El Mokawloon SC and made his debut for the senior side aged just 17 at the back end of the 2009-10 season. Salah was just 19 when he made his debut for Egypt – in a match against Sierra Leone in September 2011. After starring for Arab Contractors, Salah made the move to Europe in 2012 on the back of his hugely successful showing at the Olympics. He struck his first goal for his country against Niger, while he also represented the Pharaohs at the Olympic Games in England in 2012. FC Basel in Switzerland was his destination as he moved continents for the first time. FC Basel provided a brilliant base in his carrier. In January 2014, amid reported interest from Liverpool, Chelsea announced the signing of Salah from Basel. He spent one year with the Londoners, which included an Anfield experience that would later have an impact on his decision to come to Liverpool. Picture Credit: Background Images HD Salah moved to Italy in February 2015, initially on an 18-month loan to the Italian club Fiorentina before he joined AS Roma on 6 August 2015, where he spent two highly successful seasons and accelerated his development. Consecutively consistent match-winning performances in Rome to lead them to a second-place finish and a record points tally at 2017, Salah relocated back to the Premier League to sign for Liverpool on a long-term deal, with the Egyptian taking the club's No.11 jersey. On 22 June 2017, Salah agreed to a transfer to Liverpool. He signed a long-term contract with the Reds for an initial €42 million fee that could rise to €50 million. He became the first player ever to win three Premier League Player of the month awards in the same season. Picture Credit: Sky News On 22 April 2018, Salah was awarded the PFA Players 'Players of the Year Award. In the 2018 UEFA Champions League Final against Real Madrid, Salah injured his left shoulder in the 30th minute. After initially carrying on, he left the field in tears after going to ground in a challenge with Madrid defender Sergio Ramos. He got injured in the Champions League final on 26 May 2018 as Liverpool lost 3-1 to Real Madrid in Kiev. Mo Salah's injury news was a shock for all football fans. Mohamed Salah fitness update : The Egyptian FA stated that this would have no effect on his playing at the 2018 World Cup in Russia and that Salah would still be named in the Egyptian team's final squad. The player himself tweeted that he was “confident” of proving his fitness in time for Russia. Salah flew out to Spain earlier last week to undergo specialist treatment to aid his rehabilitation ahead of the 2018 World Cup. The Muslim often celebrates goals by performing the sujood. Salah is already wildly celebrated on the terraces both home and away, earning acclaim well beyond the club's fan base....

  • 10 Middle Eastern Dishes Everyone Should Try At Least Once

    Traveling to the Middle East can be for one of the two main reasons; to live amongst a forest of skyscrapers in a sea of desert sand or to devour the uncountable delectable local dishes that have made the Middle Eastern cuisine a go-to for comfort meals to be shared with loved ones on any occasion. Locate the best Arabic restaurants during your stay and enjoy the wholesome, rich and freshly prepared meal at a reasonable price. What’s more special about this mouthwatering cuisine is that, by tradition, each portion served is enough for a family to feast on and to have the table decorated wholly with Middle Eastern salads and the obligatory mezze platter that comes with most dishes on their menu. Middle Eastern cuisine is the cherry on top of all Halal cuisines a diner could ask for. The best authentic Arabic and Middle Eastern dishes serve the perfect combination of flavors, colors and beyond a doubt fulfill the living dream of all foodies. Here is a list of the 10 Yummiest Arabic Dishes to fill your belly! (a list which was too difficult to cut short) 1) Hummus A creamy and smooth blend of mashed chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic. Hummus is served as either a dip with the traditional pita bread and vegetables but also works its wonder when spread in a burger or even with a baked potato. Its flavor is combined with other Arabic dishes as a condiment. Hummus is more of a staple dish; this mouthwatering and healthy appetizer found in nearly all Middle Eastern restaurants is the best pick to start off your foody-ride. We definitely recommend the Abu Shukri restaurant in the Old City of Jerusalem. Foodie Tip! For the diners who are more experienced in attacking Middle Eastern dishes, ask to add in more garlic to get a taste of the true local tang. 2) Shawarma A ridiculously tasty bundle of goodness. The Arabic version of the Greek gyro with the exception of tender meat which is slow cooked on a turning spit preserving the juiciness and incorporating the rustic flavors of smokiness being the highlight in the Middle Eastern variant. This wrap of laffa/hot pita bread filled with smoky meat together with sauces, cream, veggies and the earthy authentic Arabic spices makes every bite of this Middle Eastern dish a delightful pleasure. One place that we've specially handpicked for you to try is the Hashipudia restaurant at 6 Ha-Shikma Street of Jerusalem. Foodie Tip! Shawarma is more commonly found made with either chicken or beef although the traditional option; lamb is a must try specialty. 3) Baba Ghanouj/ Ghanoush Found alongside the famous hummus on a mezze platter, Baba Ghanouj is often described as the best eggplant dish; a succulent eggplant dip and is a vegetarian favorite. Although spelled in countless ways, this dip delivers similar deliciousness all across the Middle East with a combination of flavors from roasted eggplant, garlic, Arabian spices and the famous sesame seed paste - Tahini. Like most dips, Baba Ghanouj is used as a condiment in Middle Eastern cuisine sharing its wholesome flavor with more dishes on the menu. We highly recommend trying out Zest at the One&Only The Palm in Dubai and give this Arabic goodness a shot! Foodie Tip! When ordering Baba Ghanouj, ask for it to be spiced up with chili for the real Arabic zing. 4) Halvah Picture Credit: www.myjewishlearning.com Much like the name suggests, in Arabic, Halvah means a sweet confection and is most likely the most popular Middle Eastern sweet. Halvah is much like a layered cake generally shaped like a cheese wheel. The main component of grain-based halvah is gluten like wheat, or semolina and are spongy in texture, while the main ingredient of nut-based halvah is tahini paste; sesame seeds and sugar. Although the unique flavor of plain halvah tastes just about excellent, it is often flavored with pistachio or chocolate. 5) Tabbouleh Tabbouleh, a cocktail of herbs; parsley, mint, bulgur (cracked wheat) and a handful of vegetables, onions and tomatoes, is the best appetizer not only for vegetarians but also for the health freak foodies who love to chomp but are calorie conscious. This Arabian salad is refreshing and bright, however, will leave some green stuck between your teeth so be cautious! If you happen to be in Jordan, hop by the Cairo Restaurant at the Al-Malek Talal Street in Amman, Jordan to try their Tabbouleh! Foodie Tip! To the meat lovers; this delicious salad has the ability to make you switch teams, so watch out for its yumminess. 6) Baklava Similar to the Greek baklava, this Middle Eastern sweet pronounced as baklawa is made with lots of love and layers of thin sheets of buttery filo dough filled with a mixture of coarsely ground nuts and Arabian spices; unlike the Greek that uses honey, this mixture is bound together with sugar syrup and either rose water or orange blossom. With honey drizzled on top, baklava is made in interesting shapes, for example in the shape of birds’ nests, cylinders and triangular are the more common option. Hop by the the Karakoy Gulluoglu at Rihtim Cad when you're in Istanbul to bring some of the best Baklavas home! Foodie Tip! Pistachio and walnut baklava are easiest to find, however, look out for the fruity version for an alternate experience that you’ll be glad you had. 7) Labneh Picture Credit: www.davidlebovitz.com This low in calories Middle Eastern alternative to traditional cream cheese is not too sour or strong in flavor and is easily made from cow’s milk. Labneh is a creamier, thicker and denser variant of the Greek yogurt and often found alongside hummus and tahini on the mezze platter. A great dip for za’atar pita bread, and even fruits; the versatile Labneh dip is the best to share the flavors of the Middle Eastern cuisine. Foodie Tip! Sprinkle the authentic Arabic spices on labneh to enjoy the more exciting version. 8) Falafel The globally recognized Middle Eastern dish, the falafel sandwich is much beloved and appreciated in the foodie empire. The traditional falafel sandwich is a gigantic pita bread wrapping of the falafel patty along with tangy pickles, fresh vegetables, and tahini spread. To best compliment, a falafel sandwich, order an Israeli salad to go with it. The falafel perfectly fills in for the protein on a vegetarian’s menu and paired with hummus on the obligatory mezze platter. The most interesting aspect of the savory doughnut is that the falafel patty has a crispy exterior when freshly fried contrasting to a soft and fluffy interior composed of ground chickpeas, onions and a decent amount of herbs and spices blended in to enhance the simplicity and flavor of the dish. Make a pit stop at the Books@Cafe located at the Omar Ibn Al-Khattab Street #12 First Circle in Amman, Jordan to give their falafel a try! 9) Mansaf Picture Credit: taste.co.za Jordan’s national dish, Mansaf, is culturally meant for feasts and celebratory gatherings. Mansaf in Arabic literally translates to “large tray” and therefore is served as such; enough to cater to a small foodie nation. Chunks of lamb cooked in a broth of Jameed (a variety of cheese made from fermented yogurt), dressed with yummy yogurt and garnished with almond and pine nuts are on display placed on a heap of white rice served on an oversized platter of flatbread. Initially a Jordanian dish, Mansaf migrated to Palestine, Iraq and Saudi Arabia to mark its deliciousness. If you happen to be in Amman, Jordan, we recommend you the Jabri Restaurant at Wasfi Al-Tal Street. 10) Pita with za’atar Picture Credit: ovengoodies.wordpress.com The staple component of Middle Eastern cooking, the warm and versatile pita bread is served with nearly every meal. The specialty of za’atar pita is that the dough is generously sprinkled with a blend of Middle Eastern spices which include thyme, oregano, and marjoram to uplift the sensory experience of the flavorsome bread dipped in any appetizer off the mezze platter. The original za’atar plant that is rather endangered is protected by the government to preserve the rare and authentic Mediterranean flavor, however, the blend of herbs does do justice to za’atar pita. Hence the purchase of a jar of this herb mixture is worth it to try the za’atar pita crisps recipe in the comfort of your home. For the next dish was much spoken about in this list, it felt unfair to leave it out: 11) Tahini Picture Credit: www.seriouseats.com The tahini dip, spread or condiment is made from a base of toasted and ground sesame seeds made to a paste and is essential to, if not all, many Middle Eastern dishes. Tahini collaborates well with sweet as well as savory flavors hence is a highlight on the mezze platter. An uncommon yet palatable combination is tahini and halvah, so be sure to have a go at it when possible. Buckle up for a flavorsome ride on the Middle Eastern cuisine serving wholly satisfying food and leaving you wanting more of the Mediterranean goodness. Amongst the uncountable delectable dishes on their menu, try out the dishes listed above on your next visit to the Middle East!...

  • A Guide to London Central Mosque

    London is considered one of the top destinations in the world but to the constant surprise of visitng tourists and inhabitants, it also has an array of beautiful mosques. The first of its kind in London, one of the most beautiful ones is none other than the London Central Mosque (also known as Regent’s Park Mosque). The beautiful architecture, the serenity of the location and the historical importance of the Masjid should make it a top location for both Muslims and non-Muslims to visit. Here’s why! Check out the London Muslim Lifestyle Show 2018 Find things to do in London History Picture Credit - www.iccuk.org The London Central Mosque represents a step forward in the beautiful history of religious exchange in London. In the year 1940, King George VI gifted the land on which the London Central Mosque now resides. A grand thank-you gift to honour the King Farouk of Egypt and Sudan for the Anglican Church in Cairo. It took 34 years to get started on the building infrastructure, but in 1994, the Mosque was officially completed with the two prayer halls, three storey wings, the grand entrance hall, the library, a reading room, administration offices, symbolic minaret and the golden dome which all stand as a wondrous completed unit. The international support and financing for these characteristic units of the London Central Mosque came from leaders all over the Middle-East as a representation of the strength of Islam.   Location Picture Credit - openbuildings.com Based in the affluent area of North-West London, The London Central Mosque can be found on Hanover Gate, West of Regents Park. If you're feeling adventurous, a walk through Regents Park can be an exciting way to get to the mosque, as the Gold Dome peaks through the trees and the Minaret signals your destination, and you can truly appreciate the serenity and greenery of the location, another side to London away from the hustle and bustle. It is also easily accessible by tube (Baker Street or St John's Wood) and various bus routes which would require a short walk along the streets of extravagant estates and housing. Address: The Islamic Cultural Centre & The London Central Mosque, 146 Park Road, London, NW8 7RGE-mail: info@iccuk.orgTel. : 020 7724 3363Website: http://www.iccuk.org/  Facebook | Twitter | Instagram   Architecture Picture Credit - www.iccuk.org An International competition was held to find the perfect architect for this grand project, Sir Frederick Gibberd, a prominent English architect, won with his simple but grand approach to Islamic architecture. The eye-catching golden dome and prominent minaret on the corner of the square complex gracefully replicates the traditional structures that can be found all over the Islamic world, such as Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo and Al-Zeytuna Mosque in Tunis.   Interior Design Picture Credit - facebook.com/iccuk.org If the exterior does not impress you, the inside should do the job. The bespoke chandelier hangs from the centre of the dome and the symmetrical, geometric Islamic tiled patterns colour the ring. It’s a beautiful site that could transport you spiritually to feel as though you are in a Muslim country, yet the lush greenery of London pokes through the arched windows, thus it feels as though you are in two places in the world at once.   Day-to-Day functions Picture Credit - londontemplevisits.blogspot.sg The Islamic centre offers a wide variety of services that make the London Central Mosque and Islamic Centre a versatile location with much to offer, from the Halal Café serving fresh food to an Islamic Bookshop to satisfy your curiosities and questions on the Deen. In addition, educational services for a range of ages and levels of knowledge are available, with “one of the largest and oldest Islamic reference libraries.” So, we hope that we've kindled your curiosity to visit the London Central Mosque.  Come on down, you'll be surprised by this Islamic gem in the middle of London! Find a Mosque near me in London Find a Halal Restaurant near me in London...

  • 10 Must-Try Halal Middle Eastern Dishes

    Traveling to the Middle East can be for one of the two main reasons; to live amongst a forest of skyscrapers in a sea of dessert sand or to devour the uncountable delectable local dishes that have made the Middle Eastern cuisine a go-to for comfort meals to be shared with loved ones on any occasion. Locate the best Arabic restaurants on your stay and enjoy the wholesome, rich and freshly prepared meal at a reasonable price. What’s more special about this mouthwatering cuisine is that, by tradition, each portion ordered is enough for a gathering to feast on with a pile of food being served and the table decorated wholly with Middle Eastern salads and the obligatory mezze platter that comes with most dishes on their menu. Middle Eastern cuisine is the cherry on top of all Halal cuisines a diner could ask for. The best authentic Arabic and Middle Eastern dishes serve the perfect combination of flavors, colors and beyond a doubt fulfill the living dream of all foodies. Here is a list of the ten yummiest hence most popular Arabic dishes (a list which was difficult to cut short)- via GIPHY 1) Hummus A creamy and smooth blend of mashed chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice and garlic. Hummus is served as either a dip with the traditional pita bread and vegetables, but it also works its wonder when spread in a burger, or even with baked potato.  Its flavor is combined with other Arabic dishes when used as a condiment. Hummus is more of a staple dish; this mouthwatering and healthy appetizer found in nearly all Middle Eastern restaurants is the best pick to start off your foody-ride. Foodie Tip! For the diners who are more experienced in attacking Middle Eastern dishes, ask to add in more garlic to get a taste of the true, local tang. Recommended restaurant Picture Credit - facebook.com/AbuShukriRestaurant/ Address: Abu Shukri, Via Dolorosa near Damascus Gate, Jerusalem, IsraelOpening Hours: 8am -4.30pm (sometimes later on Saturdays) Tel.: +972 2 627 1538 Facebook   2) Shawarma Picture Credit - Peteravivangel, commons.wikimedia.org A ridiculously tasty bundle of goodness. The Arabic version of the Greek gyro, with the exception of tender meat, is slow cooked on a turning spit preserving the juiciness and incorporating the rustic flavors of smokiness, the highlight of the Middle Eastern variant. This wrap of laffa / hot pita bread filled with smoky meat together with sauces, cream, veggies and the earthy, authentic Arabic spices, which make every bite of this Middle Eastern dish leave you craving for more. Foodie Tip! Shawarma is more commonly found made with either chicken or beef although the traditional option; lamb is a must-try specialty. via GIPHY Recommended restaurant Photo credit Address: Hashipudia (Yeudit), 6 Ha-Shikma Street, Jerusalem, Israel.Opening Hours: Sunday - Thursday 11am to 11pmContact: +972 2-625-4036Tel: +972 2 625 4036 Facebook   3) Baba Ghanouj/ Ghanoush Found alongside the famous hummus on a mezze platter, Baba Ghanouj is often described as the best eggplant dish - a succulent eggplant dip and a vegetarian favorite. Although spelled in countless ways, this dip delivers similar deliciousness all across the Middle East with a combination of flavors from roasted eggplant, garlic, Arabian spices and the famous sesame seed paste- tahini. Like most dips, Baba Ghanouj is used as a condiment in Middle Eastern cuisine, sharing its wholesome flavor with more dishes on the menu.  Foodie Tip! When ordering Baba Ghanouj, ask for it to be spiced up with chili for the real Arabic zing. Recommended restaurant Address: Zest, One&Only The Palm, Palm Jumeirah, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.Opening Hours: Breakfast: 7.00am to 11.00am / Lunch: 12.00pm to 6.00pm / Dinner: 6.00pm to 11.00pm (last order 10.45pm)/ Brunch: Friday & Saturday 12.00pm to 4.30pmTel: +971 4 440 1010Website: https://www.oneandonlyresorts.com/one-and-only-the-palm-dubai/cuisine/zest   4) Halvah Picture Credit - deror_avi, commons.wikimedia.org Much like the name suggests, in Arabic, Halvah means a sweet confection and is most likely the most popular Middle Eastern sweet. Halvah is much like a layer cake generally shaped as a cheese wheel. The main component of grain based halvah is glutens like wheat, or semolina and are spongy in texture, while the main ingredient of nut based halvah is tahini paste; sesame seeds and sugar. Although the unique flavor of plain halvah tastes excellent, it is often flavored with pistachio or chocolate.   5) Tabbouleh Picture Credit - cyclonebill, commons.wikimedia.org Tabbouleh, a cocktail of herbs, parsley, mint, bulgur (cracked wheat) and a handful of vegetables, onions and tomatoes, is the best appetizer for not only the vegetarians out there, but also for the health-freak foodies who love to chomp but are calorie-conscious. This Arabian salad is refreshing and bright, however it'll leave some green stuck between your teeth, so be cautious. Foodie Tip! To the meat lovers; this delicious salad has the ability to make you switch teams, so watch out for it yumminess. Recommended restaurant Picture credit - kitchico.com Address: Cairo Restaurant, Al-Malek Talal Street, Amman, JordanOpening Hours: 8am to 10pmTel: +962 6 462 4527   6) Baklava Similar to the Greek baklava, this Middle Eastern sweet pronounced as baklawa is made with lots of love and layers of thin sheets of buttery filo dough, filled with a mixture of coarsely ground nuts and Arabian spices. Unlike the Greeks who use honey, this mixture is bound together with sugar syrup and either rose water or orange blossom. Drizzled with honey to top off the unique dessert, baklava is made in interesting shapes. For example, the shape of birds’ nests, though cylinders and triangles are more common. via GIPHY Foodie Tip! Pistachio and walnut baklavas are the easiest to find, however, look out for the fruity version for an alternative experience that you’ll be glad you had. Recommended restaurant Address: Karaköy Güllüoğlu, Rihtim Cad, Kati Otopark Alti, 3-4 Karakoy, Istanbul.Opening Hours: Monday - Wednesday: 7am to 12am / Thursday - Saturday: 7am – 1am / Sunday: 8am - 1amTel: +90 212 249 96 80 Website: http://www.karakoygulluoglu.com/    Facebook | Instagram | Twitter   7) Labneh Picture Credit - stu_spivack, flickr.com This low-in-calories Middle Eastern alternative to traditional cream cheese is not too sour or strong in flavor, and is easily made from cow’s milk. Labneh is a creamier, thicker and denser variant of the Greek yoghurt, often found alongside hummus and tahini on the mezze platter. A great dip for za’atar pita bread, your favourite veggies, and even fruits, the versatile Labneh dip is best to share among the flavors of Middle Eastern cuisine. Foodie Tip! Sprinkle authentic Arabic spices on labneh to enjoy the more exciting version.   8) Falafel A globally recognized Middle Eastern dish, the falafel sandwich is much beloved and appreciated in the foodie empire. The traditional falafel sandwich is a gigantic pita bread wrapping of the falafel patty along with tangy pickles, fresh vegetables and tahini spread. To best compliment a falafel sandwich, order a salad to go with it. The most interesting aspect of the savoury doughnut is that the falafel patty has a crispy exterior when freshly fried, contrasting to its soft and fluffy interior composed of ground chickpeas, onions and a decent amount of herbs and spices blended in to enhance the simplicity and flavor of the dish. The falafel perfectly fills in for the protein on a vegetarian’s menu and as with hummus, is a staple on the obligatory mezze platter. Recommended restaurant Picture Credit - instagram.com/booksatcafe_jo/ Address: Books@Cafe, 'Umar Ibn Al Khattab, Amman, JordanOpening Hours: 9am - 2amTel: +962 6 465 0457Website: https://www.booksatcafe.com/ Facebook | Instagram | Twitter   9) Mansaf Picture Credit - Ji-Elle, commons.wikimedia.org Jordan’s national dish, mansaf is culturally meant for feasts and celebratory gatherings. Mansaf in Arabic, literally translates to “large tray” and therefore is served as such, enough to cater to a small foodie nation! This Middle Eastern resemblance of an enormous pizza looks rather intimidating for vegetarians. Chunks of lamb cooked in broth of Jameed (a variety of cheese made from fermented yoghurt), dressed with yummy yoghurt and garnished with almond and pine nuts are on display placed on a heap of white rice served on an oversized platter of flatbread. Initially a Jordanian dish, Mansaf migrated to Palestine, Iraq and the Saudi Arabia to mark its deliciousness.  Recommended restaurant Picture credit - jabri.com.jo Address: Jabri Restaurant, Wasfi Al-Tal Street, Amman, Jordan.Opening Hours: 9am to 11pmTel: +962 6 568 1700Website: http://www.jabri.com.jo/   10) Pita with za’atar Picture Credit - N. Saum, commons.wikimedia.org A staple component of Middle Eastern cooking, the warm and versatile pita bread is served in nearly every meal. Za’atar pita's specialty is that the dough is generously sprinkled with a blend of Middle Eastern spices which include thyme, oregano and marjoram to uplift the sensory experience of the flavorsome bread dipped in any appetizer off the mezze platter. The original za’atar plant, rather endangered, is protected by the government to preserve the rare and authentic Mediterranean flavor, however, the addition of herbs doesn't detract from the original taste of the za’atar pita. Hence the purchase of a jar of this herb mixture is worth it if you want to try the za’atar pita crisps recipe in the comfort of your home. Since the next dish was frequently mentioned on the list of 10 Must-Try Middle Eastern dishes, it felt unfair to leave it out:   11) Tahini Picture Credit - jules, flickr.com The tahini dip, spread or condiment is made from a base of toasted and ground sesame seeds ground to a paste and is essential to, if not all, many Middle Eastern dishes. Tahini collaborates well with sweet as well as savory flavors, and is hence a highlight on the mezze platter. An uncommon, yet palatable combination is tahini and halvah, so be sure to have a go at it when possible. Buckle up for a flavorsome ride on Middle Eastern cuisine, serving wholly satisfying food and leaving you wanting more of the Mediterranean goodness. Amongst the uncountable delectable dishes on their menu, try out the dishes listed above on your next visit to the Middle East! Check out our Travel Blog on the Middle East...



Score from 0 user