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Royal India Restaurant, located in Kolkata, West Bengal offers expertly made, fresh and Halal Indian food and more. Looking for an alcohol-free restaurant that serves incredible North Indian and Mughlai dishes? This is the ideal place for you! If you are looking for a Muslim-friendly, affordable dining experience, visit Royal India! ...more

Kolkata, India

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Royal India Restaurant, located in Kolkata, West Bengal offers expertly made, fresh and Halal Indian food and more. Looking for an alcohol-free restaurant that serves incredible North Indian and Mughlai dishes? This is the ideal place for you! If you are looking for a Muslim-friendly, affordable dining experience, visit Royal India!

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Zakaria Street, Kolkata, West Bengal

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  • Muslim-Friendly Holidays in 2018 - Halal Trip’s Best 13 Countries to visit

    If you are looking for a Muslim Friendly holiday, you have come to the right place! Halaltrip's team has put together 13 amazing countries to visit this year. It's that time when most of us reflect back on the past year and all the amazing experiences we've had. We also end up thinking about all that we wanted to do but didn't get the chance to. Well, that's all over now. It's time to look to the future into this year and plan all our amazing adventures! Of course, traveling should be a big part of your plan for 2018! Visiting different places of the world and taking in all the wonders of Allah is one of the most satisfying experiences we'll have in our short stint in this world. And as Muslims, we no longer have to wonder about Halal travel and whether we'll be able to find Halal food and prayer places because so many countries and cities around the world are becoming increasingly Halal-friendly day by day. There are so many amazing holiday destinations for Muslim families and solo travel, but here are the best Muslim-Friendly countries to visit in 2018: Credit-Giphy.com   1. Penang, Malaysia Malaysia is definitely at the top of the list of the best countries to travel to in 2018, but that's not something new as they have been the pioneers in Muslim-friendly tourism before other countries jumped on the bandwagon. On top of all that, Malaysia is also the ideal place for cheap Muslim-friendly holidays. Malaysia is a multi-cultural country, with a little more than half being Muslims. It has one of the most versatile Halal food scenes in the world, everything from street food to high-end restaurants of varying cuisines. There are also numerous mosques, and so many exciting attractions to visit. Langkawi and the Genting Highlands are just a couple places where you could even spend the entirety of a short visit! George Town, in the state of Penang, is a blend of history and contemporary Malaysia. Listed as a Unesco World Cultural Heritage Site, Georgetown in one of the best places to visit in Malaysia where you can get all the excitement of KL along with a sprinkling of history and adventure, all of it beachside! Find nearby Halal food places in Malaysia  Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Malaysia    2. Bodrum, Turkey Turkey is a Muslim-majority country with nearly 98% of the population being of the Islamic faith. This means that Muslim travellers have little to worry about in terms of finding Muslim-friendly facilities, Halal food, or prayer places. Which is a good thing, because Turkey's cuisine of rich flavours, vibrant spices, and mouthwatering aromas is definitely one you can't miss! Turkey has a number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites that depict the historical and cultural impact made throughout history, and many beautiful architectures as well as magnificent mosques. Everyone visits Istanbul, but if you want to experience the trendy side of Turkey, take yourself to Bordum town on the southwest coast. Here you can visit the ancient Bodrum Castle, take a Hamam (Turkish bath), relax in seaside resorts, or enjoy the wide array of delicious food!   Find nearby Halal food places in Turkey   Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Turkey   3. Osaka, Japan Although Japan's Islamic history is relatively brief, it is quickly becoming one of the most Muslim-friendly holiday destinations for 2018. There are over 60 mosques in the country, like the Kobe Mosque which was built in 1935 (the first mosque in Japan). The government of Japan is also working hard to make Muslims feel more welcome in their country. If you were to visit in 2018, you'd see prayer rooms with clearly marked signs in major airports, plenty of Halal restaurants (or at the least a special Muslim-friendly menu), prayer areas in public places as well as the qibla marked in hotel rooms. Tokyo, Kobe, Kyoto, and Osaka are the best destination for travellers to visit as they have a lot of Muslim-friendly facilities. The port town of Osaka is a place where modernity and the past mix together beautifully. You can witness this while visiting sights like the 16th-century shogunate Osaka Castle and old Shinto shrines, and then shopping in trendy malls, exploring futuristic buildings, and dining at modern cafes and restaurants.   Find nearby Halal food places in Japan   Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Japan     4. Kolkata, India Even with only 10% of the country being Muslims, India has the 3rd largest Islamic population in the world. This means that it's really easy to find Halal food and prayer places, no matter where in the country you choose to visit. The south, in particular, is the best part of India for Muslims to visit as it has the largest concentration of Muslims. There are hundreds of mosques all over India. The famous Jama Masjid in Delhi was built in the 1650s by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahn, who also built the monument that India is most widely recognized for – the Taj Mahal. There are so many Muslim-friendly places to visit in India that it would be hard to make a list. These places include tourist attractions, amazing Halal restaurants, mosques and Islamic sites (both new and old), and so much more! India is also one of the best value travel destinations in 2018, as it is pretty easy to travel on a budget. The city of Kolkata in West Bengal is one of the cities to focus on. Apart from having effective public transport and infrastructure, it is also known to be one of the cheapest cities to travel or live in India. Kolkata is the land of cultural festivities and is known to be the cultural capital of India. You can also visit colonial-era landmarks like the Victoria Memorial and Fort William sprawling gardens, the Marble Palace, and the Nakhoda Mosque (largest in the city).   Find nearby Halal food places in India   Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in India     5. Fez, Morocco Morocco is another country which is almost entirely made up of Muslims. But that's not all it has to offer in terms of tourism. The exotic and vibrant culture, amazing food and incredible architecture are enough to leave anyone awe-inspired, be it Muslim or not. But, of course, the fact that almost all the food in the country is bound to be Halal, and that there are loads of magnificent mosques, as well as there being so many historic and cultural Islamic attractions sweetens the deal! The city of Fez, known to be the cultural capital of Morocco, is an amazing place to visit. Those with an artistic soul will feel right at home at the incredible art museums and the historical buildings. It is also home to the oldest university in the world and is known to be the largest car-free urban area in the world, and that's certainly something to see in this day and age.    Find nearby Halal food places in Morocco   Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Morocco     6. St Julians, Malta Malta isn't exactly the first place one would think of when considering Halal-friendly holidays in Europe, but you'd be surprised at how accommodating the country is to its Muslim visitors. Islam has even been quite prevalent in the history of the island; with Muslims making major impacts in the development of the country, in the agriculture and food industries in particular. Most of the places in Malta are also named in Arabic, such as Cassar, Zammit, Farrugi, and more. Although there is only one officially recognized mosque – Mariam Al-Batool Mosque in Paola – there are a few prayer places. In any case, there are plenty of private villas and other private places where you can pray. Halal food is also widely available. One of the best places to visit is the seaside town of St Julian's, where you can go fishing, visit ancient buildings like the Baroque museum and Spinola Palace, or enjoy great food.   Find nearby Halal food places in Malta Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Malta    7. Abu Dhabi, UAE If you're looking for a luxury travel holiday destination for Muslim families, then there's no better place to visit than the UAE. With one of the world's strongest economies and a majority Muslim population, UAE is one of the richest Muslim countries in the world. You can choose between the ever-popular Dubai and Abu Dhabi to the lesser known cities like Sharjah, Fujairah, or Al Ain; they are all great places to visit! UAE is home to many of the world's most magnificent mosques, a tour of which would be compulsory on your Halal travel. There are so many other things to do like visit tourist attractions, go on safaris, and immerse yourself in shopping. It also has a wide variety of amazing food from local cuisines to international ones – and the best part: most, if not all of it, is Halal! You can choose between the cities like Dubai and Sharjah to the lesser known cities like Ras al-Khaimah, Fujairah, or Al Ain. Abu Dhabi, the capital of UAE is one of the best places to visit. Here, one gets to experience the entirety of what UAE has to offer. Visit the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque (which is certainly grand, to say the least), sprawling modern shopping malls, or even stay at desert resorts! Find nearby Halal food places in UAE Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in UAE    8. Lombok, Indonesia If you're a lover of all things natural and organic, then its time for you to book the ticket for your Halal travel to Indonesia! Made up of a bunch of islands which are mostly volcanic, Indonesia has a majority Muslim population, which means you'll feel right at home. It also means that you will never have trouble finding nearby Halal restaurants or places to pray because the country is home to many mosques, including Istiqlal Mosque in Jakarta, which is the largest in Southeast Asia. Among the things you can experience in Indonesia include picture-perfect coastlines and beach resorts, amazing wild and plant life, delicious food, and affordable shopping. It is also one of the top tourist destinations in the world where you can travel on a budget. Everyone flocks to Bali, but if you want a quieter experience, book a trip to Lombok. There's nothing to scoff about here, as it is not only an amazing surfing spot but also a great destination for divers and snorkelers. This island is also motor vehicle-free, so you know the air you're breathing is as fresh as it can get! Find nearby Halal food places in Indonesia Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Indonesia    9. Hamburg,Germany Halal travel does not have to mean you have to only travel to Muslim countries, and a great place to start exploring the rest of the world is in Germany. This European country has a prominent Muslim community who manage to thrive although they are much smaller in number. Despite what you might have heard, Germans are generally very accepting of Muslims and assimilate into them well. Berlin is one of the best places for a Muslim to visit, as there is plenty of Halal food options available. There are also a number of mosques all across the country, including the Cologne Central Mosque in Cologne which is the largest mosque in Europe! Some of the top things to do in Germany include exploring all the cultural and historical sites, enjoying good food, and take in the awe-inspiring nature and landscapes. The city of Hamburg proudly claims to be “the gateway to the world”. While this might be a bold assertion, it backs it up by being a thriving port town with historic buildings, museums, beautiful parks and beaches. There's also plenty to do here, from classical performances to sporting events and regular markets.  Find nearby Halal food places in Germany  Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Germany   10. Sri Lanka Known as “the pearl of the Indian Ocean”, Sri Lanka is a tiny island nation off the south coast of India. Although the majority of the people follow Buddhism, the minorities of Hindus, Christians and Muslims are also widely prevalent, Islam is the largest of them. Sri Lanka is one of the top places to visit in the world in 2018 for Halal-friendly travel because the country has many Muslim-friendly facilities. There are a number of mosques all over the island, and Halal food is easily available (with most international chains even being Halal-certified). The people are extremely friendly and accommodating as well. Sri Lanka is the best place for a relaxing vacation of lounging around on gorgeous beaches and getting pampered in all-natural spas, but also has opportunities for those who are adventurous or love to witness exotic wildlife in their natural habitats. Picture Credit - gallefortguide.com Galle, a city in the south of the country is an amazing place to visit. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with old Dutch-colonial buildings, quirky cafes and eateries, beautiful beaches, as well as historical mosques. Galle is the place to go if you're an artist looking for inspiration, or a sea-lover.  Find nearby Halal food places in Sri Lanka  Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Sri Lanka  11. Aqaba, Jordan For those of you that are history buffs, Jordan is one of the top tourist destinations in the world. The city captures a sort of old world charm that makes you feel like you've stepped into the past. Jordan wouldn't be for the travellers that look flashy technology and large-scale attractions, but for those who revel in the beauty of nature, culture, and friendly people. Jordan is home to many UNESCO World Heritage Sites, historical monuments, seaside resorts, and nature reserves, including the incredible ancient city of Petra. It is a Muslim country, therefore you do not have to worry about finding Halal food, mosques, or other Muslim-friendly facilities. If you want to take a break, Aqaba, the only coastal town in Jordan, is one place you can visit. This laid-back town is the ideal destination for those that live the underwater life, from diving to snorkeling and so much more! Find nearby Halal food places in Jordan Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Jordan   12. Jeju, South Korea Yes, the land of kimchi is a great place for Muslim travellers too! Although there isn't a large population of Muslims, it is slowly growing and the Korean government has taken major steps to encourage Muslim tourists to visit the country. One of which is the Halal Restaurant Week Korea, an annual event in which restaurants from all around the country participate. There are also plenty of things to do in Korea, including affordable shopping, amazing festivals, and incredible weather (autumn is the best!). South Korea has 8 mosques all over the country, but there are many more prayer places as well as in restaurants and stores. Cities like Seoul, Busan, and Jeju are the best options for Muslim travellers. The island of Jeju (largest in the country), in particular, is a place you cannot miss. It is the place the locals flock to when it comes to a getaway, and you will love it too. Beautiful sandy beaches, a posh countryside, luxury beach resorts, and amazing food – what more could you want?  Find nearby Halal food places in South Korea Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in South Korea   13. Singapore Singapore is a multicultural country with people of all backgrounds and races. About 14% of the country's population follows Islam, which means Muslim travellers won't have trouble finding facilities catered towards them. There are many mosques in the island, the largest being Sultan Mosque which is also constituted as a national monument. Singapore also has a prominent gastronomic scene; many restaurants are already Halal-certified or Muslim-friendly, with more making the shift every day. Singapore is a great place to shop till you drop, especially when it comes to fashion. But you can also enjoy other things like amazing architecture and monuments, as well as nature and wildlife.  Find nearby Halal food places in Singapore Find nearby prayer places and Mosques in Singapore...

  • 18 Must-try Traditional Indian Sweets

    India is one of the most fascinating places in the world that you can travel to. This massive country can seem polar opposite from one minute to the other, from snowy mountains to blisteringly hot beaches, from the super rich to those living in the streets, from incredible modern architecture to ancient buildings, India has all that and more.   Depending on which part of the country you go to, you are sure to find incredible Halal food places nearby. Though the food may range from vegetarian dosas to tandoori chicken, one thing all of India has in common is its sweet tooth. That's right, Indians love their sweets, and once you have a taste of authentic Indian sweets, you'll love it too!   Indian sweets, or “Mithai” as they are known, are mouthwatering little parcels of joy. They are often made with loads of milk, sugar, butter, ghee (clarified butter), fruit and nuts. The incredible smell of ghee is what makes them so unique, and what keeps you coming back for more. All traditional Indian sweets are vegetarian and alcohol-free, and therefore, Muslim-friendly as well.   Different Indian sweets come from different parts of the country. Many of them have been around for centuries, and you'll find classic versions of them as well as modern variations. You will be able to find most of these sweets, regardless of where they came from, in sweet shops all across India (and you will never be too far away from a sweet shop, that's a guarantee!)     Credit - giphy.com   Here are 18 must-try traditional Indian sweets that you'll find on your Muslim-friendly travel to India.   1. Gajar Halwa (Carrot Halwa) You might have snuck a few vegetables into your spaghetti bolognese to trick your kids into eating them, but the Indians have truly mastered the art! Gajar (carrot) halwa is a sweet or dessert that is made using carrots that are grated and boiled in sweetened milk. It is finished off with ghee (clarified butter) and garnished with nuts. This sweet can be enjoyed hot or cold. Gajar ka halwa is pretty popular in Punjab, and some say that this is where it originated from.   2. Barfi Barfi is dense milk-based traditional Indian sweet; sort of like the Indian fudge! This is one of the favourite sweets of India, and everyone loves coming up with their own adaptation of this classic sweet. There are so many types of barfi that come from all around India that it would be impossible to list all of them, but perhaps the most popular type of barfi is the kaaju barfi (cashew barfi). Barfis are also made using gram flour, pistachios, peanuts, and a whole host of other variations.   3. Rasgulla Rasgulla is another classic Indian dessert made with milk. Milk curds (chenna) are separated by curdling boiling milk with acid (like lemon juice) and then used to make a dough with a few other ingredients. This dough is then divided into golf-sized balls and boiled in sugar syrup until plump and juicy. This popular Indian sweet is said to have originated in East India, specifically in West Bengal and Odisha.   4. Rasamalai Rasamalai is a sweet that evolved through rasgullas. The dough balls of chenna are formed and boiled in cream with saffron, and nuts, which it is served in after. As a result, rasmalai is a softer, richer relative of rasgulla. Many believe that this dish was created by K.C. Das of the present-day K.C. Das Grandsons, a famous sweet shop in West Bengal, but others say that's not true.   5. Payasam Picture Credit - www.vegrecipesofindia.com   Payasam is a dessert/drink that is popular in South India, often served after a meal during special occasions like festivals and weddings. This is another milk-based dessert, and it is served with vermicelli and nuts.   6. Kulfi Picture Credit - www.archanaskitchen.com Kulfi is India's contribution to the world of ice creams, and it is a delicious one at that! Like most ice creams, it is made from a mixture of milk, cream, and flavourings (most often saffron, cardamom and pistachios or almonds). But it does not contain egg and it is frozen in moulds without being churned, resulting in a denser, richer product. Modern variations of this favourite sweet of India include flavours like chocolate, mango, strawberry, and so much more. This dessert is believed to have originated from the Mughal empire in the 16th century.   7. Soan Papri Picture Credit - food.ndtv.com   This is another traditional sweet that is a favourite of everyone. Thin, tiny strands of spun sugar are compressed together and cut into squares, served with flaked almonds and pistachios on top. The experience of eating a soan papri is almost like eating cotton candy in that it dissipates the moment it hits your tongue. You can find packaged soan papri in almost all Indian shops and supermarkets. These have a longer shelf life than most sweets, so you can take them back home from your Muslim-friendly travel in India as souvenirs!   8. Halwa Picture Credit - www.vegrecipesofindia.com   The Indian sweet Halwa shares its name with a load of other desserts from countries in the Middle East and Africa, but India's version of Halwa itself comes in so many different colours, shapes, and tastes. If you're in Karnataka, you'd be given “kesari halwa” made of semolina and saffron, while Tamil Nadu's city of Tirunelveli is famous for it's “Tirunelveli halwa” made of wheat flour and loads of nuts.   9. Gulab Jamun Gulab jamuns are another sweet that is prepared using khoya. A dough is made out of them, similar to a rasgulla, but it is deep fried until golden brown before being soaked in sugar syrup. Even though the preparations of both start out similar, the end product tastes pretty different. Gulab jamuns are one of those sweets that rank on top of the list of favourite Indian sweets all across the country.   10. Kheer Kheer is an Indian rice pudding that is made by boiling a mixture of rice, broken wheat or vermicelli in milk and sugar. Often flavoured with cardamom, saffron, nuts and raisins, this pudding is served as dessert after a meal.   11. Mysore Pak If you're in the search for the most decadent sweet in all of India, it might be time to call it to an end because we're pretty sure it's Mysore Pak. This rich dessert is made from cooking out chickpea flour and ghee (lots and lots of ghee!). The final product is a yellowish square of pure richness, and why not, as it comes from the royal city of India – you guessed it, Mysore!   12. Chikki   Chikki is a traditional Indian sweet that is said to have originated in the South Indian State of Tamil Nadu. Chikki is a sort of brittle that is made of peanuts and jaggery. Apart from that, there are also many other varieties of Chikki made from different sugars, nuts, and seeds. Chikki is also something you can get from most supermarkets in mini-packets.   13. Phirni People in India often associate Phirni with Muslims and our festivals, so there is absolutely no way a Halal food guide to India's traditional desserts can miss out on it. This dessert is a pudding that is made by boiling milk together with semolina and sugar. It is traditionally served refrigerated in mini earthen pots.   14. Gujiya Picture Credit - www.playfulcooking.com   Guija is a traditional sweet that you are more likely to find in the Northern parts of the country, particularly Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Bihar, and Uttar Pradesh. It is a sweet that has khoya (milk boiled until the liquid evaporates) stuffed inside a samosa-like encasing (although shaped differently) and deep fried. The filling can also vary to include various nuts, dry fruit, coconut, etc.   15. Ada Ada is another traditional Indian dessert that originates from the South, particularly Kerala and Tamil Nadu. A dough of rice flour, coconut and jaggery are steamed in between a banana leaf. Modern-day cooks also make it in non-stick pans, resulting in a something that resembles a pancake.   16. Laddoo Laddoos are round-shaped sweets made out of minced dough and sugar. These are often at the forefront of any special occasion, and an Indian sweet box would not be complete without the appearance of one of these bright-yellow balls of goodness. Laddoos have also been developed in different adaptations such as the chocolate laddoo, coconut laddoo, etc.   17. Jalebi Jalebi is a pretzel-shaped sweet that is made of deep-fried batter soaked in sugar syrup. It is slightly chewy in texture and yellow in colour, owing to the saffron infused in the sugar syrup. The best way to eat a jalebi is when it is hot out of the frier, while it's still slightly crunchy and soaked in warm syrup. Yum! Jalebi has many different spellings and variations in pronunciation depending on where you go in India, but one thing that's common all across is their popularity.   18. Modak Hailing from the state of Maharashtra, Modak is a sweet that looks like dumplings. Its outer shell is made of rice or wheat flour mixed with khoya and stuffed with a mixture of coconut and jaggery. This dumpling is then either fried or steamed and served with melted ghee.   Download Halal Trip app to locate nearby Halal food places >> https://www.halaltrip.com/islamic-travel-app/  ...

  • Getting Married? - Who To Contact For Nikah services

    What Is The Meaning of Nikkah? Picture Credit - www.vitalaims.pk   Nikkah is the Islamic marriage ceremony that occurs between a Muslim man and Muslim woman, combining their lives as partners going forward. It is a personal contract as well as a social announcement of such a contract. Getting married is said to “complete half of somebody's deen” and is an act that is strongly encouraged by Qur'an and Sunnah. "And one of His signs is that He has created for you, spouses from amongst yourselves so that you might take comfort in them and He has placed between you, love and mercy. In this, there is surely evidence (of the truth) for the people who carefully think." - [Al-Qur'an: Surah 30, Verse 21] The Prophet Muhammed (saw) said: “Marriage is my Sunnah. Whosoever keeps away from it is not from me.” - [Sahih-Al-Bukhari]   Steps to Getting Married in Islam   The stages of a Muslim Nikah ceremony are as follows:   1. Consideration Picture Credit - www.justnikkah.com This is the first step of a Muslim wedding. Usually, the elders in the family will seek a suitable partner for their children through friends, family, or marriage consultants. The proposal for marriage is then sent to either the bride or the groom's parents. Alternatively, a young man may approach the father or guardian (wali) of the woman he wishes to marry and ask for her hand.   “A woman may be married for 4 reasons: for her property, her family status, her beauty and her piousness in religion, blessed are those that marry her because of her deen (piousness).” - [Sahih-al-Bukhari & Sahih-al-Muslim]   Note: There is no intermingling of two non-mahrams or “dating” allowed before getting married. The bride and the groom are however allowed to meet and talk in a controlled setting with a mahram (father/brother/guardian) present.   2. Consent Picture Credit - www.yorkplacestudios.co.uk The sought out party will then accept the proposal after receiving consent from the man/woman who is to get married. This is a very important step as there is no moving forward if there is no consent. Any conditions/ terms of marriage must be agreed upon before moving further as well (e.g. moving to another country after marriage, etc.)   Khansa bint Khidam Al-Ansariya narrated that her father gave her in marriage when she was a matron and she disliked that marriage. So she went to Allah's Apostle and he declared that marriage invalid. - [Sahih-al-Bukhari]   3. Nikah Picture Credit - www.mccminnesota.org   Then comes Nikah, which is the actual ceremony of marriage. There are few things that are involved in the Nikah being valid. They are:   - Mahr: The groom must present the bride with “mahr”, a marriage gift or dower. It may be in the form of money, jewellery, or other things of value, or even a simple act. There is no specified amount or description for mahr, it depends on different people and their cultures. Mahr may be paid upfront, promised at a later date, or a combination of both.   “And give the women (on marriage) their dowry as a free gift; but if they, of their own good pleasure, remit any part of it to you, take it and enjoy it with right good cheer.” - [Qur'an 4:4]   Sahl bin Sad (rali) narrated that the Prophet (saw) said to a man, "Marry, even with (a Mahr equal to) an iron ring." - [Sahih-al-Bukhari]   - Ijab-o-Qubool: Then comes “Ijab” expressing the willingness to get married and “qubool” acceptance of the offer. Qubool is usually granted by the wali on behalf of the bride. A written contract (Aqd-Nikah) is then signed by the bride, groom, and two witnesses of sane mind (two males, or one male and two females). The wali must also be present, otherwise, the marriage is invalid.   - Khutbah: The Imam (or any other knowledgeable Muslim) will then address the people gathered at the Nikah ceremony and the bride and groom with a sermon, most often about Islamic marriages and the Sunnah of Prophet Muhammad (saw).   4. Waleema Picture Credit - www.maharaniweddings.com   Once the Nikah is over, a wedding banquet called the “walima” is held by the groom. One of the main purposes of a walima is to let the community know that a marriage has taken place between two people, this is important as secret marriages are discouraged and a marriage is only said to be valid if it is made known.   The other purpose of a waleema is to celebrate with friends, family and loved ones. It is also very important that the poor people of the community are invited to the banquet along with everyone else. It is better when the ceremony isn't extravagant or wasteful, as the Prophet (saw) has said:   “The most blessed nikah is the one with the least expenses.” - [Al-Bayhaqi]   He (saw) also said: “The worst food is that of a wedding banquet (walima) to which only the rich are invited whilst the poor are not invited. And he who refuses an invitation (to a banquet) disobeys Allah and His Messenger (saw).” - [Sahih-al-Bukhari]   Narrated by Anas: “The Prophet did not give a better wedding banquet on the occasion of marrying any of his wives than the one he gave on marrying Zainab, and that banquet was with (consisted of) one sheep.” - [Sahih-al-Bukhari]   Where to Find Nikah Services Picture Credit - www.thecitycircle.com   There are many agencies around the world that provide Nikah services. Think of them as a matchmaking platform, only that these Muslim wedding services are completely Halal. Some of them exist purely offline, but most are taking their platforms online to keep up with the modern world. Of course, the process will depend on the particular country and the particular agency (even though the process of Nikah is well defined and exact, the process of finding a partner is not).   There are many places that offer Nikah services that do not include the process of finding a match but do guide you through everything else, i.e. registration, overseeing of the ceremony, etc. If you are unsure of where to go for Nikah services in your country, your closest mosque would be the best bet. Even if they themselves do not provide such services, they will be able to direct you to those who do.   Here are some places where you can find Nikah services and other useful information in a few countries around the world:   Singapore   Sultan Mosque http://sultanmosque.sg/services/wedding-solemnisation (65) 6293 4405 / 6293 4043   Masjid Al-Islah 6312 5174 https://alislah.sg/corporate-services   Online:   Registration of Muslim Marriages (ROMM) – Singapore Government https://www.romm.gov.sg/index.asp   Nakkahwin - Malay Muslim Marriage Portal http://www.nakkahwin.com/   WannaGetMarried – Chinese, Indian, and Western Marriage Portal http://www.wannagetmarried.com/   Malaysia   Masjid Wilayah http://www.masjidwilayah.gov.my/index.php/prosedur/prosedur-perkahwinan-di-wilayah-persekutuan 03-6201 8791/8767/8780   Online:   SingleMuslim https://www.singlemuslim.com/content/international/Malaysia%20Nikah   Find Your Muslim Partner http://www.findyourmuslimpartner.com/page/uk/muslim-marriage-malaysia/   Indonesia   Masjid Agung Sunda Kelapa (Jakarta) +62 21 31934261   Istiqlal Mosque (Jakarta) +62 21 3811708   Sri Lanka   Wekanda Jumma Masjid (Colombo) http://wekandamasjid.com/ 011 2320355   Online:   Sri Lanka Nikah Service https://srilankanikahservice.wordpress.com/   Nikah Lanka http://nikahlanka.com/   India   Kathija Nikah Muslim Matrimony Services (Chennai) http://www.kathijanikah.com/ +91 9941697533 / 9941697956   Marriage Solutions (Delhi) http://marriageregistrationindelhi.com/India-Delhi-NCR-Nikah?id=4798 9868219296   Nikah Qubool (Bangalore) +(91)-80-23536177   Nikah Matrimonial Service (Mumbai) +(91)-22-23742687   Humsafar Marriage Bureau (Kolkata) +91 97484 33019   Hyderabad Nikah (Hyderabad) +91 1800 121 4787   Online:   Nikah In Kerala https://www.nikahinkerala.com/   Nikahnamah – Muslim Matrimonial http://www.nikahnamah.com/   Rishta Matrimonial http://www.rishtaforyou.com/   Register Marriage http://registermarriage.in/   Taqwa Marriage http://taqwamarriage.com/about-muslim-marriage-bureau   United Kingdom   Al-Ihsan Marriage Service (London) https://alihsanmarriage.co.uk/ +44 20 7650 3026   Swansea Mosque and Islamic Community Center (Wales) https://www.swanseamosque.org/nikkah-marriage-services/   London Central Mosque (London) http://iccuk.org/ +44 20 7724 3363   Birmingham Central Mosque (Birmingham) http://centralmosque.org.uk/services/marriage-bureau/ +44 121 440 5355   Epsom and Ewell Islamic Society (EEIS) (Surrey) http://www.eeis.co.uk/index.php/nikah-service 01372 210 828   Leeds Grand Mosque (Leeds) http://www.leedsgrandmosque.com/services/marriage 01132468789   Online:   Nikah Services http://www.nikahservices.co.uk/   The United States of America   Frisco Masjid, Inc. (Dallas) https://friscomasjid.org/nikah-services/ (469) 252-4532   EPIC Islamic Center (Texas) http://www.epicmasjid.net/services/nikah-services 214 7443 786   Jamaat Ibad-ar-Rahman (North Carolina) http://www.ibadarrahman.org/marriage/# (919) 683-5593   New York Qazi Office (New York) https://nyqazioffice.com/ (718) 864-4803   Islamic Institute of Boston (Boston) 617-365-7427   IMAN Center (Washington) http://www.iman-wa.org/cms/services/weddings/ (206) 202-IMAN (4626)   Taqwa Islamic Center (California) http://taqwaic.org/marriage-service/ (510) 894-4684   Canada   Masjid Bilal – Muslim Society of Cumberland (Ontario) http://www.masjidbilal.org/marriagenikah-services/ (613) 841-0786   Winnipeg Central Mosque (Manitoba) http://www.winnipegmosque.org/wedding-nikah (204) 783-6797   Australia   Auburn Gallipoli Mosque (New South Wales) http://www.gallipolimosque.org.au/nikah +61 2 9646 5972   Hisham Obeid (Perth) http://perthmuslimcelebrant.com.au/ 041 888 1321   Islamic Society of South Australia (Adelaide) http://www.islamicsocietysa.org.au/marriage-services   Mustafa Arja - Authorised Islamic and Civil Marriage Celebrant (Sydney) http://www.muslimcelebrantsydney.com.au/ 0405 664 402   Worldwide– Online   Worldwide Islamic Marriage Bureau http://www.islamicmarriagebureau.com/   Nikah.com https://nikah.com/   Muslim Matrimonials https://www.muslimshaadi.in/   Muslim Nikah Services http://www.muslimnikahservices.com/   Nikah Explorer https://www.nikahexplorer.com/   Way To Nikah https://www.waytonikah.com/  ...

  • The Adventure of Ibn Battuta

    ‘Never, so far as possible, to cover a second time any road.’ Abu Abdallah Ibn Battuta may be the Inspiration behind Robert Frost’s ‘the road not taken’ by his quote extracted from the Rihla. ‘Never, so far as possible, to cover a second time any road’. Ibn Battuta was the greatest traveller of the pre modern time. He has visited even more countries and travelled further than the famed Marco Polo. He had travelled for 75,000 miles (more than any traveller of his time) for 29 years away from home. The 14th Century was an age where exploration was just beginning, the sea trades being established by the business merchants. As a Muslim, travelling for Hajj was mandatory and hence several Muslims set forth for it. So did Ibn Battuta who left his Home at Tangier, Morocco at the age of 21 in the year 1325. Thus begining his extraordinary Journey to far off lands. To Reach Makkah, Ibn Battuta passed through Cairo, Egypt, Nile Valley, Palestine, Hebron, Jerusalem, and Haram al Sheriff, Damascus, Arabian Desserts, and Medina and then he reached Makkah. After performing his Hajj and earning the prestigious title of a haaji, Ibn Battuta did not return home. He wanted to explore different places and hence set forth on his own. In 1326 he joined a caravan from Makkah to Mesopotomia (Iraq), Tigris, Euphrates, Baghdad, Tabriz, Persia. In the year 1330 he travelled to Jiddah, Red sea, Arabian Sea, Aden, Somalia Dar al-Islam and then Oman.  He entered Anatolia(turkey) and was offered by the ruler to be a religious and legal scholar as he was well versed in the Islamic Jurisprudence having studied Islamic Law. He crossed the Black Sea, Cremea, Kaffa, Genoa, The golden Horde and Constantinople. Deciding that he had seen enough of the western and European world he set forth on a horse to India passing through Afghanisan, Hindu Kush and Indus Valley and reached India in 1333. In India he was appointed by the ruler Mohamed Ibn Tughluq as a Judge. After serving some time he was sent on an official delegation to China to present gifts to the Mongol Emperor. He boarded his ship in Calicut (Kolkata) and passed through the Kozhikode, Ceylon, Maldives, Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, strait of Malaca and reached China in the city of Chuan Chou. From there he went to Canton, Huangchou and Beijing. He returned back to Damascus in the year 1350 where the Black Plague was spreading. He then went to Fez, Ceuta, Spain, Grenada, and Gibraltar to flee the Plague. Then travelled southward to Mali, Timbuktu and Gao. In 1353 he returned to Fez where the Sultan commanded him to record his Journey which was done by Ibn Juzayy a scholar from Granada. Thus came about ‘the Rihla’ the auto-biography travelogue of Ibn Battuta. The Cultures that he has travelled to was very different from his own but as a traveller he opened his mind to the new ways of life beyond what he already knew. There were incidents mentioned in the Rihla where he had saw cultural misfits but he learnt the best out of people and places, focussed on the positives of the culture. He even mentions the food he had in various places. He was away for 29 years from home, visiting around 40 countries and met around thousands of people in the ancient time where the mode of transportation was only of Horses and ships. The greatest traveller he was indeed. Recommended Reads: The Adventure of Ibn Battuta by Rose E.Dunn Travels with a Tangerine by Tim Mackintosh.    ...



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